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NASIG 2020 has ended
NASIG will be an online conference, June 9-11. It will be free, but registration will be required. Registration closes 5 June. Please see our Code of Conduct.

Times listed below are Eastern Daylight Time (GMT-4). The sessions listed at 5 PM on 11 June will be prerecorded and will be available when the conference begins. Please tweet about this session using the hashtag #NASIG2020.


Announcing the 35th Annual NASIG Conference Online 

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Tuesday, June 9
 

11:00am EDT

Opening Session / Keynote - “Mapping Domain Knowledge for Leading and Managing Change"
Change often seems like  a constant force in libraries. Many have picked up some tools and techniques over time, yet still may feel ill-equipped to face the next  change initiative. This talk will present a multitude of topics at a very high level in the overlapping areas of leadership, change management, and project management, as a sort of map to those domain areas. This information will allow participants assess their current skill sets and identify areas that  she or he needs and wants to grow in order to better participate in change processes in his or her organization.

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
avatar for Janetta Waterhouse

Janetta Waterhouse

Director of Technical Services and Library Systems, University at Albany SUNY


Tuesday June 9, 2020 11:00am - 12:30pm EDT
Live - Zoom

12:45pm EDT

Analyzing Workflows and Improving Communication Across Departments: A Simple Project Using Rapid Contextual Design
In summer 2017, the unit heads for electronic resources cataloging and acquisitions at a large research university undertook an analysis of the workflows between departments. We used a user experience research method called Rapid Contextual Design, a method designed principally for digital product management and evaluation that also lends itself well to workflow analysis.

We were able to design a quick and simple assessment within our limited available time. We discovered that communication was the main problem. Our current methods were not very effective, especially with the staff who are doing much of the work; each department tends to focus on its own issues and not communicate outside. The result was confusion and inefficiency.

As a result, we have worked to create venues for sharing information across the departments to increase efficiency and to build a sense of community among the staff. We also plan on discussing the results of an assessment of these changes that we conduct in early 2020.

The presentation will provide people with simple techniques for analyzing their local workflow and information-sharing practices, some ideas for interrogating and improving intra-technical services communication, and ideas for simple changes that can improve communication and build a sense of community/joint purpose within or across departments.

Session outline:
1. Discuss the reasons we undertook the initial workflow analysis, and the process we used to conduct it using Rapid Contextual Design. We will show how Rapid Contextual Design was adapted to our particular needs and schedules
2. Discuss our discovery that communication was our largest problem, and describe our approach of implementing small changes to address this in small, simple ways
3. Discuss the assessment of these changes: have there been improvements in staff understanding through the use of these changes?
4. Conclude with discussion about how others might adapt the Rapid Contextual Design method for their own needs

Learning outcomes:
1. Understand more about the Rapid Contextual Design user experience research method and how it can be adapted to analyze workflow issues and other user experience assessment projects
2. Apply to apply Rapid Contextual Design techniques for their own institutional needs

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
avatar for Jharina Pascual

Jharina Pascual

Electronic Resources Acquisitions Librarian, University of California, Irvine
SW

Sarah Wallbank

Electronic Resources & Serials Cataloging Libraria, University of California, Irvine



Tuesday June 9, 2020 12:45pm - 1:35pm EDT
Live - Zoom

1:45pm EDT

Practical Approaches to Linked Data
Linked Data is exploding in the library world, but the biggest problems libraries have are coming up with the time or money involved in converting their records, looking into Linked Data programs, finding community support, and all the various other issues that arise as part of developing new methods. Likewise, one of the biggest hurdles for libraries and linked data is that they do not know what to do to get involved. As we have fewer people available and smaller budgets each year, we would like to explore ways in which libraries can get involved in the process without expending an undue amount of their already dwindling resources. To see how linked data can be applied, we will look at the example of the Smithsonian Libraries (SIL). Over the past 18 months, SIL has been preparing for the transition from MARC to linked open data. This session will talk about various SIL projects and initiatives (such as the FAST headings project and the introduction of Wikidata and WikiBase); how to incorporate linked data elements into MARC records; and how to develop staff and give them proficiency with new tools and workflows.

Slides (Slideshare)Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
avatar for Heidy Berthoud

Heidy Berthoud

Head of Resource Description, Smithsonian Libraries and Archives
Head of Resource Description for the Smithsonian Libraries and Archives, and point person for our African ethnic groups Wikidata project. When we're working onsite, my office is located in the National Museum of Natural History, but my department provides description for materials... Read More →
avatar for Jeannie Hartley

Jeannie Hartley

Cataloging and Serials Librarian, Friends University
I came to Friends University's Edmund Stanley Library in September of 2018 as the Cataloging and Serials Librarian. My focus is on managing the collection as a whole, including serials and other materials. Cataloging and serials are very different beasts, which lends to my work a... Read More →


Tuesday June 9, 2020 1:45pm - 2:35pm EDT
Live - Zoom

2:45pm EDT

Walk this way: Online content platform migration experiences and collaboration
Online content has become the norm in modern libraries, with a large percentage of our collection hosted on vendor-controlled web-based content platforms. Content platforms provide tools for searching, viewing, and interacting with content, and may provide a variety of additional functionality. Vendors continuously strive to improve their platforms, and periodically transition from one platform to another. While new platforms can improve user experience, expand and hone functionality, and increase security, the migrations involve a lot of work and can be disruptive, affecting end-users, librarians, publishers, and service vendors.

Despite the tedious preparation by publishers, vendors, and librarians, content platform migrations are rarely seamless. Due to the complexities involved, a problem-free migration is the exception rather than the norm. The NISO Content Platform Migration Working Group was formed to address these challenges and aims to establish recommended practices and checklists to standardize and improve platform migration processes for all stakeholders involved with online content platforms.

In this session, a librarian and a publisher will share their perspectives on content platform migrations, and the Working Group Co-chairs will describe the group’s efforts to-date and expected outcomes. Our publisher-side speaker will describe issues they must consider when their content migrates, such as providing continuous access, persistent linking, communicating with stakeholders, and working with vendors. Our librarian speaker will describe their experience and steps they take during migrations, such as receiving notifications about migrations, identifying affected e-resources, updating local systems to ensure continuous access, and communicating with their front-line staff and patrons.

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
avatar for Athena Hoeppner

Athena Hoeppner

Discovery Services Librarian, University of Central Florida
Athena Hoeppner is the Discovery Services Librarian at the University of Central Florida, in Orlando, Florida. Her career in academic libraries spans 25 years with roles in public services, systems, and technical services. In her current role, she jointly oversees the eResources lifecycle... Read More →
avatar for Matthew Ragucci

Matthew Ragucci

Associate Director of Product Marketing, Wiley
I am Wiley's resident librarian and provide insight on metadata sharing strategies for optimizing its electronic resources for discovery, access, and usage. This includes working closely with librarians and library solutions providers alike to get the tools they need to help the end-user... Read More →
avatar for Xiaoyan Song

Xiaoyan Song

Electronic Resources Librarian, NC State University Libraries
Xiaoyan Song is the Electronic Resource Librarian (ERL) at the Monograph Unit in the Acquisition and Discovery (A&D) department at NCSU Libraries. She mingles with all aspects of ebooks including acquisition, license negotiation, activation, ebook troubleshooting, and workflow mapping... Read More →


Tuesday June 9, 2020 2:45pm - 3:35pm EDT
Live - Zoom

3:45pm EDT

Sponsor Lightning Session 1

Speakers
avatar for Paula Brewster

Paula Brewster

Regional Sales Manager, EBSCO
I work with EBSCO Subscription Services as the Regional Sales Manager in IA, MN, MO, ND, SD, and WI. I've been with EBSCO for 20 years. If you have questions about print journals, E Journals, & E Journal Packages, FLIPSTER, Usage Consolidation, and other resources from EBSCO, just... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Clinton

Andrew Clinton

Marketing Manager, Community and Platform Outreach, ACS
ACS Publications is dedicated to helping researchers advance scientific excellence to solve global challenges through journals, eBooks, scientific programs, and the newsmagazine Chemical & Engineering News.
avatar for Dave Celano

Dave Celano

Sales Director, Americas, De Gruyter
david.celano@degruyter.comDave is the Americas Sales Director at De Gruyter.
avatar for Jason Priem

Jason Priem

cofounder, Our Research
Jason Priem is a cofounder of Our Research, the nonprofit behind Unpaywall and the Unsub data dashboard. As an Information Science PhD student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Jason helped create the field of altmetrics--coining the term, authoring the influential... Read More →

Sponsors


Tuesday June 9, 2020 3:45pm - 4:15pm EDT
Live - Zoom

4:25pm EDT

What Patrons Really Want (In Their Streaming Media): Using focus groups to better understand emerging collections use.
Streaming video in libraries has been available for over ten years, but has recently greatly expanded in use and importance. Indeed, demand has increased so much that many libraries across the country were forced in the last year to limit streaming video to classroom use only. The University of North Carolina Greensboro (UNCG) is no exception, with streaming media usage doubling over the last three years. This growth combined with the relative newness of many of these streaming options meant that the collection development librarians at UNCG did not know how these services were being used in the classroom, where faculty learned about library streaming media, and what issues faculty faced technologically when they tried to use our collection. Many of these questions had been sparked by earlier marketing research conducted at UNCG, which demonstrated that while faculty were interested in using streaming video, there was a good deal of confusion about how to access it through the library or what was available. In order to better understand these survey results, the collections team at UNCG decided to go straight to the source and speak to faculty using focus groups.

This presentation has two main objectives. The first is to share the results of these focus groups with librarians, especially examining it in conjunction with previous marketing survey results. In the qualitative analysis of the four focus groups we conducted, we discovered strong faculty preferences in how they want to receive information and training, when marketing efforts were most likely to be impactful, and what types of discovery techniques they are using and want to be able to use to locate streaming video. We believe that sharing our findings will help other librarians as they develop new collection policies, decide what products to purchase, and consider how to get the word out about collections. We will compare our own findings with those of the few individual interview studies conducted by librarians around streaming media in the last five years to build a more comprehensive view of trends and lessons.

The second main objective of this presentation is to explore the methodology used as a model for libraries to develop collection and marketing strategies in new and emerging areas that are informed by direct, in-depth user input. By using our focus group as a case study, we will highlight key aspects of developing research questions, creating focus group scripts, recruitment, and running these groups. We will also examine the pitfalls we ran into so that others can avoid them.

Slides (Google)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
avatar for Kate Hill

Kate Hill

Library Services Engineer, EBSCO


Tuesday June 9, 2020 4:25pm - 4:55pm EDT
Live - Zoom
 
Wednesday, June 10
 

10:00am EDT

First-Timers Meetup
Is this your first time at a NASIG conference? Xiaoyan Song from the Mentoring & Student Outreach Committee will be on our Discussion Forum from 10am-12pm on Wednesday to answer your questions. After that the room will stay open and other Committee members may pop by to say hi and answer more questions.

First-Timer's Meetup

Speakers
avatar for Xiaoyan Song

Xiaoyan Song

Electronic Resources Librarian, NC State University Libraries
Xiaoyan Song is the Electronic Resource Librarian (ERL) at the Monograph Unit in the Acquisition and Discovery (A&D) department at NCSU Libraries. She mingles with all aspects of ebooks including acquisition, license negotiation, activation, ebook troubleshooting, and workflow mapping... Read More →


Wednesday June 10, 2020 10:00am - 12:00pm EDT
Discussion Forum

11:00am EDT

International Publishing Partnerships
Collaboration is essential to scholarly publishing. The whole enterprise relies on partnerships at all stages: publishers collaborate with authors from pitch to publication, with leading scholars through peer review, with other editors and media personnel in the promotion of their publications, with distributors and vendors who connect the books to their broadest possible audience. The trend for university presses to migrate under the organizational umbrella of libraries has prompted innovative collaborations with scholarly communications and library publishing units. A few scholarly publishers have even entered into vanguard international collaborations, which have introduced efficiencies in the acquisition, production, and distribution of a joint list while extending the global reach of these publications. This session features editors instrumental in establishing two of these rare transatlantic publishing arrangements: Clemson University Press’s partnership with Liverpool University Press and the partnership between the Medieval Institute Publications at Western Michigan University and De Gruyter, an independent publisher headquartered in Berlin. Case studies of each partnership will explore the benefits of international collaboration, the challenges that arise from it, and, ultimately, how transatlantic partnerships are impacting scholarly communications.

Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
AC

Anthony Cond

Managing Director, Liverpool University Press
avatar for John D. Morgenstern

John D. Morgenstern

Director, Clemson University Press
Scholarly publishing
TW

Theresa Whitaker

The Medieval Institute Publications at Western Michigan University


Wednesday June 10, 2020 11:00am - 11:50am EDT
Live - Zoom

12:00pm EDT

Web Accessibility in the Institutional Repository: Crafting User-Centered Submission Policies
As web accessibility initiatives increase across institutions, it is important not only to reframe and rethink policies, but also to develop sustainable and tenable methods for enforcing accessibility efforts. For institutional repositories, it is imperative to determine the extent to which both the repository manager and the user are responsible for depositing accessible content. This presentation allows us to share our accessibility framework and help repository and content managers craft sustainable, long-term goals for accessible content in institutional repositories, while also providing openly available resources for short-term benefit.

Indiana University’s institutional repository, IUScholarWorks, audited the accessibility of its existing content and created policies to encourage accessible submissions. No established workflows considering accessibility existed when this audit took place, and no additional resources were allocated to facilitate this shift in focus. As a result, the Scholarly Communication team altered the repository submission workflow to encourage authors to make their finished documents accessible with limited intervention.

We identified a spectrum of accessibility services, ranging from applying nascent accessibility practices to implementing long term solutions. When initiating new policies, responsibility for accessibility will often fall more heavily upon the user, while ideal practices aim to be more collaborative in nature. Initially, instead of concentrating resources on retroactively deleting non-accessible content, we focused on our submission process, which we believe emphasizes the importance of depositing accessible documents. We created guidelines that allow users to add basic accessibility improvements without needing to significantly restructure or rewrite their document. Our guidelines provide “quick fixes” that authors can easily implement to their finished documents prior to submission, including adding structural tags and alt text, clearly labeling lists, and identifying document language. Moving forward, we aim to implement ideal accessibility standards for deposited work, regardless of format or origin.

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum
Resources

Speakers
JH

Jenny Hoops

Open Access Publishing Manager, Indiana University Libraries
MM

Margaret McLaughlin

Jay Information Literacy Scholar, Indiana University


Wednesday June 10, 2020 12:00pm - 12:50pm EDT
Live - Zoom

1:15pm EDT

Full Text Coverage Ratios: A Simple Method of Article-Level Collections Analysis
In academic library discovery services, the article reigns supreme. For many users, the journals that publish these articles are an afterthought at most. Nonetheless, most methods of periodical collection development and analysis still focus on the journal as the object of interest. This presentation will describe a simple and efficient method of using a discovery layer to evaluate periodicals holdings at the article level, and suggest a variety of applications, including:
  • comparing the relative strength of holdings across academic programs
  • identifying content areas in need of particular attention
  • evaluating the benefits of prospective resources
  • demonstrating the value of current resources

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Goddard

Matthew Goddard

E-Resources Librarian, Iowa State University
Some things that interest me: -- strategies for providing a superior user experience -- systems design that empowers rather than infantilizes -- improving library-vendor relations -- discovery evaluation and assessment -- practical applications of randomness.


Wednesday June 10, 2020 1:15pm - 2:05pm EDT
Live - Zoom

2:15pm EDT

Sponsor lighting session 2

Speakers
avatar for Jenifer Maloney

Jenifer Maloney

Senior Consortia Account Manager, Oxford University Press
Oxford University Press: University Press Scholarship Online (UPSO): Discover what’s new in this ground-breaking online library bringing works from the world’s best university presses onto a single, easy-to-use resource and new journals joining our 2021 Oxford Journals Collec... Read More →
avatar for Kristen Twardowski

Kristen Twardowski

Library Sales Manager, U.S. and Canada, Duke University Press
Kristen Twardowski is the current Vice-Chair for NASIG's Equity & Inclusion Committee. She is also the Library Sales Manager for the U.S. and Canada at Duke University Press's and is eager to talk about e-books, open access, and equity and inclusion.
avatar for Lorna Vasica

Lorna Vasica

Sales Manager, AIP Publishing
avatar for Kristina Jutzi

Kristina Jutzi

Senior Account Manager, Bloomsbury Digital Resources
avatar for Dan Ascher

Dan Ascher

Account Development Manager, Springer Nature
Dan is the Account Development Manager for the Southwest. He has spoken at many national conferences such as ALA Midwinter & Annual, Charleston, and most recently ACRL in Cleveland, OH. He is in charge of usage statistics, discovery, and institutional marketing/promotion for the... Read More →
RS

Reeta Sinha

Academic Licensing Manager, Springer Nature
Reeta Sinha has been the Springer Nature Academic Licensing Manager for university libraries in the southwestern U.S for 5+ years. She has worked in academic libraries and in the library industry for over 25 years and has been an active member of professional organizations such as... Read More →
KW

Kristen Wilson

ReShare Project Manager, Index Data Project Manager/ Business Analyst

Sponsors


Wednesday June 10, 2020 2:15pm - 3:05pm EDT
Live - Zoom

3:15pm EDT

COUNTER 5: Lessons learned and new insights achieved
COUNTER Release 5 has brought many improvements to usage reporting. A COUNTER Executive Committee member will provide an overview of how the project teams have worked to ensure that the publishers and vendors are now compliant with the new standard, and how you can verify their compliance. The session will explain how Release 5 enables you to compare apples to apples in this messy landscape and the best metric for calculating cost per use of a book title. The second half of this presentation will address some of the thorny questions that accompany COUNTER R5’s improvements. Which metrics are the best for decision making or demonstrating value? How can we balance the needs for accuracy and long-term consistency in reporting journal usage? This presentation will share the perspectives of two electronic resources librarians from university libraries with different campus compositions, budgets, and procedures. These librarians will share how they are adapting the renewal procedures of their libraries and some of insights they have gained from the new data about user behavior and differences between vendor platforms.

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
avatar for Jill Emery

Jill Emery

Collection Development & Management Librarian, Portland State University
I am the Collection Development Librarian at Portland State University Library and have over 20 years of academic library experience. I have held leadership positions in ALA ALCTS, ER&L, and NASIG. In 2015, I served as the ALA-NISO representative to vote on NISO/ISO standards on behalf... Read More →


Wednesday June 10, 2020 3:15pm - 4:05pm EDT
Live - Zoom
 
Thursday, June 11
 

11:00am EDT

A multi-institutional model for advancing open access journals and reclaiming the scholarly record
Numerous factors contributed to the development of the journal Communications in Information Literacy (CIL), which began publication in 2007. Countering the monopolistic and exclusionary practices of commercial journal publishers was a leading concern. The co-founders were motivated by the possibilities of what was then an awakening open research environment to create a truly open access journal, filling a gap in the literature, and helping the library field to commence with reclaiming control of its scholarly record. There were many challenges to this undertaking; among them was the lack of institutional capacity to host or support a library publishing initiative. Accordingly, CIL was developed on the open source platform, Online Journal Systems (OJS), and it was maintained on a commercial web host. The journal grew and flourished under this model for ten years, but continued expansion of CIL and the increasing challenges of maintaining the journal on OJS prompted an exploration of alternative open access publishing options. This led to discussions, negotiations, and ultimately, a partnership with Portland State University. In 2017, CIL migrated from OJS and a commercial web host to Portland State’s Digital Commons (bepress) publishing platform, PDXScholar.

The presenters will provide brief overviews of CIL and PDXScholar, and they will detail the challenges and ultimate successes of this multi-institutional model for advancing open access journals and reclaiming control of the scholarly record. They will highlight the content migration process from OJS to PDXScholar, post-migration actions to correct metadata, the introduction of functioning DOIs, and coordinating with both free web and commercial indexers to assure proper access to the newly-moved journal. The presenters will also discuss the practicalities and the policy implications of this move, particularly in light of Elsevier’s acquisition of bepress. Finally, the presenters will advance their partnership as an exemplar of transformational publishing and as a viable, sustainable model for scholars in other fields to emulate.

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
avatar for Karen Bjork

Karen Bjork

Head of Digital Initiatives and Scholarly Publishi, Portland State University Library
SB

Stewart Brower

University of Oklahoma, Tulsa
avatar for Christopher Hollister

Christopher Hollister

Head of Scholarly Communication, University at Buffalo Libraries
Chris Hollister is the University at Buffalo’s Head of Scholarly Communication. In that role, he develops and advances initiatives related to scholarly publishing, open access, and open education. A longtime advocate and activist for transforming the current system of scholarly... Read More →


Thursday June 11, 2020 11:00am - 11:50am EDT
Live - Zoom

12:00pm EDT

How Do We Ensure “Read” Institutions Can Still Contribute to a “Publish”-oriented OA Ecosystem?
One of the few benefits of the subscription business model is scholars at all institutions (in theory!) *read* scholarly content. Therefore, a business model based on access for institutions does not exclude any scholarly institutional customers. But, not every institution *publishes* scholarly content and, thus far, most Open Access (OA) business models are based upon the service costs of *getting published*.

How, then, can we more equitably spread the costs of OA (from which everyone at least benefits even if not everyone publishes) to include all institutions, including those that mainly or solely read content?

Speakers will discuss:
  • the roles “read” institutions can and/or should play in an open paradigm
  • how to manage the perennial “free rider” issues (if that is indeed a thing…)
  • the risks associated with losing “read” institutions, and their $$$, from the business model ecosystem
  • the responsibilities of “read” institutions to the OA ecosystem
  • how the speakers and their organizations are proposing to tackle this issue from their various vantage points
Speakers will bring both publisher and library perspectives, and this session will represent the cutting edge of OA business model experimentation beyond the APC.

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
avatar for Jill Grogg

Jill Grogg

Strategist, Content and Schol Comm Initiatives, LYRASIS
Jill Grogg is a Strategist with the Content & Scholarly Communication Initiatives team at LYRASIS. Previously, she was electronic resources coorindator at The University of Alabama Libraries for over a decade.
avatar for Jason Price

Jason Price

Research and Scholarly Communications Director, SCELC
avatar for Lev Rickards

Lev Rickards

Co-Interim University Librarian, Santa Clara University
avatar for Sara Rouhi

Sara Rouhi

Director, Strategic Partnerships, Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Sara Rouhi is the Director of Strategic Partnerships at PLOS focusing on developing new business models for sustainable, inclusive open access publishing. In 2020 she launched PLOS first collective action business model for highly selective publishing, PLOS Community Action Publishing... Read More →
avatar for Courtney Young

Courtney Young

University Librarian, Colgate University


Thursday June 11, 2020 12:00pm - 12:50pm EDT
Live - Zoom

12:50pm EDT

Lunch / Ice Cream break
Have a bit of ice cream to participate in NASIG's traditional ice cream break

Thursday June 11, 2020 12:50pm - 1:15pm EDT
Live - Zoom

1:15pm EDT

Supporting Students: OER and Textbook Affordability Initiatives at a Mid-Sized University
In 2018 the Alabama Commission on Higher Education kicked off a statewide program to increase awareness and adoption of Open Educational Resources (OER) at colleges and universities. Spurred by the efforts of ACHE, the University of North Alabama committed to OER and textbook affordability programs and included OER adoption as a key aspiration in their 2019-2024 strategic plan "Roaring with Excellence". With support from the president and provost of the university, Collier Library adopted strategic purchasing initiatives, including database purchases to support specific courses as well as purchasing reserve copies of textbooks for high-enrollment, required classes. In addition, the scholarly communications librarian became a founding member of the OER workgroup on campus. This group’s mission is to direct efforts for increasing faculty awareness and adoption of OER. This presentation will discuss the structure of the each of these programs from initial idea to implementation. Included will be discussions of assessment of faculty and student awareness, development of an OER grant program, starting a textbook purchasing program, promotion of efforts, funding, and future goals.

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer L. Pate

Jennifer L. Pate

Open Educational Resources & ScholCom Librarian, University of North Alabama


Thursday June 11, 2020 1:15pm - 2:05pm EDT
Live - Zoom

2:15pm EDT

Calculating how much your University spends on Open Access, and what to do about it
Librarians are working hard to understand how much money their university is spending on open access article processing fees (APCs), and how much of what they subscribe to is available as OA. This information is useful when making subscription decisions, considering Read and Publish agreements, rethinking library open access budgets, and designing Institution-wide OA policies.

This session will talk concretely about how to calculate the impact of Open Access on *your* university. It will provide an overview on how to estimate the amount of money spent across a university on Open Access fees: we will discuss underlying concepts behind calculating OA article-processing fee (APC) spend and give an overview of useful data sources, including:
  • FlourishOA
  • Microsoft Academic Graph
  • PLOS API
  • Unpaywall Journals

We will also talk about Open Access on the subscription side, including how much of what you subscribe to is available as open access and how you can use that in your subscription decisions and negotiations.

The presenters are the cofounders of Our Research, the nonprofit company behind Unpaywall, the primary source of Open Access data worldwide.

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
avatar for Jason Priem

Jason Priem

cofounder, Our Research
Jason Priem is a cofounder of Our Research, the nonprofit behind Unpaywall and the Unsub data dashboard. As an Information Science PhD student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Jason helped create the field of altmetrics--coining the term, authoring the influential... Read More →
JP

Jason Priem

cofounder, Our Research



Thursday June 11, 2020 2:15pm - 3:05pm EDT
Live - Zoom

3:15pm EDT

Ctrl + Alt + Repeat: Strategies for Regaining Authority Control after a Migration
In 2019, a new position of Authorities Metadata Librarian was hired at Northwestern University libraries. This role created the opportunity to set ongoing authority control workflows and clean up the backlog of problems that accumulated in the four years since migrating to Alma. While still contributing NACO records, Northwestern did not implement authority control workflows in Alma.

This proposal is for a presentation on how to regain authority control in a large research library catalog: first, dealing with a backlog of problems from years without authority control and second, creating a process for ongoing workflows to realistically maintain authority control when new records are added to the collection.

The presentation will begin with an assessment of the catalog’s authority control environment. It will include approaches to performing authority control, using tools such as Alma Analytics, OpenRefine, and MarcEdit. It will also discuss topics around diversity and inclusion in metadata. Overall, it is a presentation on how one library strategically approached authority control.

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
avatar for Jamie Carlstone

Jamie Carlstone

Authority Metadata Librarian, Northwestern University Libraries
I am currently the Authority Metadata Librarian at Northwestern University. I've previously held positions in serials cataloging. I am interested in using coding to automate cataloging and metadata cleanup.


Thursday June 11, 2020 3:15pm - 4:05pm EDT
Live - Zoom

5:00pm EDT

Access to Supplemental Journal Article Materials
The use of supplemental journal article materials is increasing in all disciplines. These materials may be datasets, source code, tables/figures, multimedia or other materials that previously went unpublished, were attached as appendices, or were included within the body of the work. Current emphasis on critical appraisal and reproducibility demands that researchers have access to the complete shared life cycle in order to fully evaluate research. As more libraries become dependent on secondary aggregators and interlibrary loan, we questioned if access to these materials is equitable and sustainable. While NISO standards RP-15-2013 Recommended Practices for Online Supplemental Journal Article Materials were published in 2013, it is unclear if these standards fully meet the needs of users, if aggregators and publishers are following these standards, and if library processes and procedures are facilitating access to supplemental journal article materials. While studies have surveyed authors, reviewers, and readers, or examined journal supplemental materials practices, no studies have surveyed library staff and librarians about their experience with access to supplemental materials and requesting and receiving supplemental materials through interlibrary loan. This study surveyed library employees from academic, hospital, public and special library settings in the United States about their experience identifying, finding, and retrieving supplemental journal article materials, and proposes ways that libraries, publishers and aggregators can enable access to the complete published life cycle.

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
avatar for Electra Enslow

Electra Enslow

Head of Library Research and Instruction, Washington State University Libraries
avatar for Suzanne Fricke

Suzanne Fricke

Animal Health Sciences Librarian, Washington State University
I serve as liaison librarian to the College of Veterinary Medicine on the WSU Pullman campus.
SS

Susan Shipman

Access Services Manager, Washington State University Library


Thursday June 11, 2020 5:00pm - 5:45pm EDT
Prerecorded

5:00pm EDT

Bridging the Public Services and Technical Services Divide: Hosting a Librarian Sabbatical
The world of acquisitions, collections, and electronic resources can be complex and intimidating to library faculty who have had little experience in the area. Libraries will often have opportunities for cross-department work, for example on large scale weeding projects, but there are few opportunities for extended learning in non-assigned areas. It is also rare for acquisitions, collections, and electronic resources staff to share their expertise with interested people in long-term settings.

This session will share Albertsons Library’s experience with hosting an access services librarian’s sabbatical in acquisitions and collections. Original goals of the sabbatical were for the librarian to: understand the framework for how the work of acquisitions is structured and executed; and understand the e-resource lifecycle to bring back critical skills to inform better service desk training. Though access services maintains the physical collection, and helps patrons navigate the digital collections through information and reference desks, staff in the area traditionally were not exposed to e-resource workflows, and thinking through how items are purchased, tracked and categorized. During the 5 month long sabbatical, the librarian learned about the ins and outs of the unit and sub-groups that included ordering, receiving, serials, gifts, resource sharing, copy cataloging, budgeting, licensing, and electronic resources.

We will discuss:
  • Hosting an intern/sabbatical requires time and effort of acquisitions and collections staff; we will share their perspectives about having a long term house guest and how they opened their doors to her learning.
  • Framing and structuring of skills and competencies -- for success of the individual librarian and of the unit.
  • What the different unit managers learned about describing their work and processes to someone inexperienced in their field.
  • Benefits of using a sabbatical period to learn about how resources are acquired, to inform and strengthen working relationships between units.
  • Benefits of exposing traditional public services staff to the work flow and complex work environment of technical services.
  • Benefits of intra-library sabbatical/internships to deepen knowledge and support the institution.

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
avatar for Mary C. Aagard

Mary C. Aagard

Interim Head, Acquisitions & Collections, Boise State University Albertsons Library
I joined Boise State University\\'s Albertsons Library as Head, Access Services in January 2012. I currently serve as Interim Head, Acquisitions and Collections which includes: ordering, gifts, interlibrary loan, receiving, serials, copy cataloging, licenses, usage data, and electronic... Read More →
avatar for Marlena Hooyboer

Marlena Hooyboer

Library Manager Specialist, Receiving & Collections, Boise State University, Albertsons Library
avatar for Pamela D. Kindelberger

Pamela D. Kindelberger

Library Specialist, Manager, Boise State University Albertsons Library
I have worked in academic libraries for 22 years. For the last 19 years, I have worked at Boise State University in the Acquisitions and Collections Unit doing Ordering, Interlibrary Loan and Gifts. In 2014 I became the Manager for the Ordering, Interlibrary Loan and Gifts Team... Read More →


Thursday June 11, 2020 5:00pm - 5:45pm EDT
Prerecorded

5:00pm EDT

Communications and context: strategies for onboarding new e-resources librarians
The Electronic Resources Life Cycle created by Oliver Pesch is presented as a standard reference for e-resource librarians within the NASIG Core Competencies for Electronic Resources Librarians. The Core Competencies serve as guidelines for e-resources librarians to contextualize the functions of their job in relation to the resources they manage. The e-resources librarian must propagate the life cycle of an institution’s resources, which requires an extensive amount of effective communication. Effective communication is such a vital component of an e-resources librarian’s job that it is Core Competency four. Pesch’s life cycle chart may more accurately be understood as a node; a component of a larger graphic in which the node connects to a detailed cycle of communication. This contextualization may better serve early career librarians to realize the extensive scope communications with stakeholders plays in their role.

E-resources librarians are intermediaries; people who communicate often with vendors, other librarians, department heads, directors, IT, and patrons. The scope and workflow placement of varying types of communication differs based on institution type. An e-resources librarian stepping into a new position must acclimate to the life cycle of resources at the institution while also navigating new and pre-existing relationships at the institutional level.

This presentation will detail onboarding strategies institutions can utilize to help acclimate new e-resources librarians with an emphasis on strategies for effectively establishing and perpetuating communications with stakeholders. This will be conveyed by addressing the following questions: how might institutional knowledge, including administrative functions and vendor relationships, best be documented for a new e-resources librarian? If someone isn’t available to train the new librarian or assist them with acclimating to their role, what steps are in place for the librarian to adapt to the proper channels of communication both internally and externally in their institution? How might someone new to the profession contextualize their onboarding and professional relationships within the NASIG Core Competencies for Electronic Resources Librarians framework?

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
avatar for Bonnie Thornton

Bonnie Thornton

Electronic & Continuing Resources Librarian, Mississippi State University


Thursday June 11, 2020 5:00pm - 5:45pm EDT
Prerecorded

5:00pm EDT

Exploring Perpetual Access
This session ponders what ‘forever’ access to licensed resources means, both as intellectual property and technological access. New initiatives such as Controlled Digital Lending (CDL) and Occam’s reader are potential tools that work for the public good. While new initiatives can be exciting, the promise of perpetual access can be difficult to fulfill. Specific examples of how libraries and publishers have met, or failed to meet, license terms regarding perpetual access will be presented. How to best provide perpetual access to items outside of license agreements, such as Open Access journals and OER will also be broached. We will examine how practical, economic, and culturally responsive library initiatives fit within the constraints and opportunities allowed under licensing, copyright, and staffing levels. Participants will be invited to consider whether perpetual access is a goal that is necessary, merely encouraged, or something else entirely.

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Polchow

Michelle Polchow

Electronic Resources Librarian, University of California, Davis
Michelle supports the management and troubleshooting of e-resources access in coordination with library colleagues, vendors, and the California Digital Library, regardless of UCD researcher venues. She is an advocate for understanding and promoting library e-rights, encouraging future... Read More →


Thursday June 11, 2020 5:00pm - 5:45pm EDT
Prerecorded

5:00pm EDT

Getting on the Same Page: Aligning ERM and LibGuides Content
For many years, the University of North Texas Libraries' ERM and LibGuides pages were administered separately with no shared oversight. Over time, the number of subject terms and keywords assigned in both systems grew and diverged significantly, leading to confusion on acceptable search terms and a wide variation in subject specificity. Recently, a committee was formed to review and revise the LibGuides subjects and associated processes. This work led to a revamping of the parallel work done for the ERM to not only align with the LibGuides process, but to feed into the LibGuides A to Z database list. This presentation will give background on the development of the initial processes, the review and revision of the processes,and the issues encountered in developing a workflow for importing data from one system to the other.

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
avatar for Todd Enoch

Todd Enoch

Head of Serials and Electronic Resources, University of North Texas
Todd Enoch obtained his MLS in 2005 from the University of North Texas while working in their library as a staff member, first in Cataloging and later in Serials. In February 2006, Todd was hired as a librarian at UNT, and has been working as the Head of Serials and Electronic Resources... Read More →


Thursday June 11, 2020 5:00pm - 5:45pm EDT
Prerecorded

5:00pm EDT

Knowledge Bases: The heart of resource management
This session will discuss the knowledge base metadata lifecycle, current and upcoming metadata standards, and the effect that knowledge bases have on discovery and e-resource management. The presenters will look at ways knowledge bases can be leveraged to create downstream tools for resource management and discovery. The session will also provide different perspectives on knowledge bases, including from librarians and product managers, as well as a discussion of the NISO's KBART Automation recommended practice and what this could mean for knowledge bases in the future. The session will also include a conversation regarding how leveraging knowledge bases can aid librarians in improving resource discovery within their own libraries and ultimately decrease the amount of time spent on metadata workflows. Through this presentation, we also aim to improve communication between the library community and metadata providers and creators.

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
EL

Elizabeth Levkoff Derouchie

Metadata Librarian for Serials & Electronic Resources, Samford University Library
avatar for Beth Ashmore

Beth Ashmore

Associate Head, Acquisitions & Discovery (Serials), North Carolina State University
EV

Eric Van Gorden

Product Manager, EBSCO


Thursday June 11, 2020 5:00pm - 5:45pm EDT
Prerecorded

5:00pm EDT

Measure Twice and Cut Once: How a Budget Cut Impacted Subscription Renewals from Analysis to Workflows
The Pollak Library at California State University, Fullerton utilizes a subscription agent, a common practice amongst libraries to help manage the purchasing and maintenance of print and electronic serial, journal and database subscriptions. In the summer of 2019, the library was faced with a significant materials budget cut for the following fiscal year and decided to take a fresh look at its subscriptions held with their subscription agent, Harrassowitz, in hopes of finding opportunities to make cancellations. The process of looking at subscriptions with the goal of proactively downsizing revealed that the library’s existing renewal workflows were outdated and in need of regular analysis to identify underused resources. Additionally, this project uncovered shortcomings of analysis that is reliant on usage data, the unexpected ramifications of large-scale subscription cancellations, as well as the need for improved communication within and between the many library departments affected by subscription cancellations. Attendees can expect to learn more about current practices for analyzing subscriptions based on cost and usage as well as workflows involving a subscription agent.

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
IC

Ilda Cardenas

Electronic Resources Librarian, California State University, Fullerton
avatar for Keri Prelitz

Keri Prelitz

Collection Development Librarian, Cal State Fullerton
I am the Collection Development and Management Librarian at Cal State Fullerton, but I began my career in collection development working with academic libraries on behalf of a books vendor. I am passionate about collection development (truly!), enjoy analysis and collaboration, and... Read More →
avatar for Greg Yorba

Greg Yorba

Electronic Discovery Librarian, California State University, Fullerton
I am the Electronic Discovery Librarian at California State University, Fullerton. I have been in that position since 2013. I am celebrating my 30th year at CSU Fullerton. For fun I play in the Orange County Guitar Orchestra, a group of approximately 23 classical guitarists.



Thursday June 11, 2020 5:00pm - 5:45pm EDT
Prerecorded

5:00pm EDT

Read & Publish – What It Takes to Implement a Seamless Model?
“Read & Publish” agreements continue to gain global attention. What’s rarely discussed when these new access and article processing models are introduced is the paperwork, back-end technology and overall management required to implement the new program that works for all involved. This panel, comprised of a librarian, publisher, and researcher, will focus on the complexities of developing, implementing and using the infrastructures of different Read & Publish models and the challenges of developing a seamless experience for everyone.
From article submission to publication to final reporting, the panel will discuss the “hidden” impact that new workflows will have on stakeholders in scholarly communications. Time will be allotted for Q&A and attendee participation is encouraged.

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
avatar for Adam Chesler

Adam Chesler

Director, Global Sales, AIP Publishing
avatar for Sara Rotjan

Sara Rotjan

Assistant Marketing Director, AIP Publishing
AA

Andre Anders

Director, Leibniz Institute of Surface Engineering (IOM) Editor in Chief of Journal of Applied Physics Professor of Applied Physics, Leipzig University, Leipzig University
avatar for Keith Webster

Keith Webster

Dean of Libraries and Director of Emerging and Integrative Media Initiatives, Carnegie Mellon University
Keith Webster was appointed Dean of University Libraries at Carnegie Mellon in July 2013 and to the additional role of Director of Emerging and Integrative Media Initiatives two years later. He is a Professor in the University’s Heinz College of Information Systems and Policy. Keith... Read More →


Thursday June 11, 2020 5:00pm - 5:45pm EDT
Prerecorded

5:00pm EDT

The Power of Cross-unit Data Sharing: Nontraditional Uses for ILLiad
Interlibrary loan is most known for borrowing and supplying scholarly materials not held locally by the library, but a lesser known fact about the unit is that it also serves as a data center which can be used to inform and improve the work done in other areas. This session will provide two examples of how ILLiad, an interlibrary loan software, was used to collect and share data with other units to improve workflows and services. At Austin Peay State University, ILLiad data was used to gain a holistic understanding of the information needs of various patron groups, which led to projects like purchasing digital access to resources requested by distance students, identifying collection gaps, purchasing titles repeatedly requested by students, and implementing a faculty buy-not-borrow policy. Similarly, ILLiad was used at Louisiana State University to report electronic resource access issues to the newly hired Electronic Resources Librarian. A year’s worth of data revealed the most common types of access issues impacting LSU’s electronic resources, training opportunities for ILL staff, and most significantly, the revelation that ILL staff and troubleshooters engage in many of the same procedures to carry out their work, prompting her to wonder if the intersection of ILL request processing and troubleshooting present an opportunity for restructuring. Time will be allotted for questions from audience members.

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
ML

Megan Lounsberry

Louisiana State University
NW

Nicole Wood

Resource Management Librarian, Austin Peay State University


Thursday June 11, 2020 5:00pm - 5:45pm EDT
Prerecorded

5:00pm EDT

The Serial Cohort: A confederacy of catalogers
In 2018, at a time when our department was shrinking through attrition, the decision was made to further leverage the particular skill sets of a select group of monographic catalogers by training them to also undertake the complex copy cataloging of serials.

This presentation concerns the assumptions underlying how this decision was originally made, the initial plan for how this would be accomplished by CONSER Bridge Training, the eventual formation of the Serials Cohort with a view to creating an iterative process I would design and manage, and the problems, obstacles and time constraints faced and addressed along the way.

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
MH

Mandy Hurt

Serials Description Coordinator, Duke University Libraries


Thursday June 11, 2020 5:00pm - 5:45pm EDT
Prerecorded

5:00pm EDT

Transforming Library Collections and Supporting Student Learning with Collection Mapping
This presentation discusses how the use of collection mapping transformed outdated and unbalanced print collections at Florida SouthWestern State College into collections directly supporting student learning. A collection map is a data driven picture of specific areas of library collections. This approach differs from past approaches to collection development as it doesn't focus on a breadth of subject areas striving to develop a large collection of many volumes that students could possibly find useful, but rather, considers various factors including program enrollment figures, reference interactions, and course content to develop a collection that contributes to the quality and integrity of academic programs. The presenter will explain methodologies used, including the creation of collection maps, and share results the project has yielded for FSW's Rush Library.

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
avatar for Arenthia Herren

Arenthia Herren

Librarian, Head of Print Collecitons, Florida SouthWestern State College


Thursday June 11, 2020 5:00pm - 5:45pm EDT
Prerecorded

5:00pm EDT

When to Hold Them, When to Fold Them: Reassessing Big Deals in 2020
While the University of California's negotiations with Elsevier have received heavy news coverage, little information has been shared as to how smaller, non-R1 institutions are addressing the issue of managing their journal packages. Pepperdine University Libraries have cancelled major publishers’ journal packages and have continued providing access to the content needed from these publishers while saving money in the process. Maintaining large journal packages is a major issue in our profession; the recent “ACRL Environmental Scan 2019” underscored "many are now weighing the potential costs and opportunities in cancelling their Big Deal subscriptions". This presentation will focus on how libraries can save money on unsustainable big deals, providing the considerations and alternatives for a path forward from the perspective of a medium-sized university.

The circumstances of journal packages becoming unsustainable and how libraries can respond to these challenges depends on the size of one’s institution. We recognize there are no one-size-fits-all solutions to this problem, but we will share our experiences and the solutions we found that can be transferable to others. This process involves identifying journal packages for cancellations and dealing with patron demand following the cancellations.

During the early days of the Big Deal phenomenon, Pepperdine licensed many journal packages because our consortium, SCELC, adeptly negotiated favorable licenses. At the time, prices were lower and packages were smaller. As the years passed, large publishers absorbed more publications annually, bringing higher costs and titles of lower relevance to our library. Each year we analyze cost per use, and each year the cost per use increased on many of our packages. We reached the point where these increases were unsustainable and we had to make cancellations. Coinciding with this tipping point, alternatives to licensing entire packages emerged or became more viable for us. The mindset of many of our peer institutions has also changed. Libraries across the country have adopted more of a just-in-time rather than just-in-case mentality, and most libraries realize that they no longer need to own everything.

This presentation will go into details for each of the publishers’ big deals that we examined and present reasons as to why we cancelled them, with concrete examples from our experiences (four cancellations and two restructurings). We will also discuss the alternative solutions we implemented and what the reaction has been. We will talk about alternative methods to obtain individual articles. We aim to provide attendees strategies for evaluating, managing, or restructuring unsustainable big deals.

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Parang

Elizabeth Parang

Research & Instruction Librarian, Pepperdine University
I have been a member of NASIG since 1989, was the Secretary for 2004/2005-2005/2006, have served on five committees, attended all NASIG conferences from 1989-2013, and have written up many presentations.
avatar for Jeremy Whitt

Jeremy Whitt

Head of Collection Development & Assessment, Pepperdine University


Thursday June 11, 2020 5:00pm - 5:45pm EDT
Prerecorded

5:00pm EDT

Where do we keep that? The new Keepers Registry and the digital content in your collection
The Keepers Registry is an international registry of e-serial content preserved by archiving institutions and organizations. Recently, it has moved its home to the ISSN International Centre. This move highlights both the challenges of maintaining common services and the benefits of allying them with complementary services. The Keepers Registry had previously been hosted by Edina at the University of Edinburgh and funded by JISC. Once JISC decided to refocus and allocate its money elsewhere, there was little time to find and fund a new home for the Keepers Registry. The scramble over the past six months illustrates the need to ensure hosting and funding not merely for content, but for the services we all use to help us do our work in building collections and managing the content within them. Luckily, the ISSN International Centre was not merely interested in serving as the home for the Keepers Registry, but showed how the Keepers Registry is a natural complement to the other services provided by the ISSN IC. We shall show how the Keepers Registry and some of the other services offered by the ISSN IC can be used to great benefit by libraries, publishers and all those invested in scholarly communication. It will provide a look into what digital preservation means in a practical sense and what that means in terms of a commitment by individual institutions and through collective action.

Slides (Slideshare)
Recording (YouTube)
Discussion Forum

Speakers
avatar for Willa Tavernier

Willa Tavernier

Open Scholarship Librarian, IU Bloomington
Hi! In my work as the Open Scholarship Diversity Resident Librarian I work to advance all forms of open scholarship with a particular focus on outreach and impact. I am active in the BIPOC in LIS community and my current areas of research are knowledge commons & governance in scholarly... Read More →
avatar for Ted Westervelt

Ted Westervelt

Chief, US/Anglo Division, Library of Congress


Thursday June 11, 2020 5:00pm - 5:45pm EDT
Prerecorded
 
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